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Unopposed Actions

Unopposed Actions

For each unopposed action, the GM sets a difficulty level (Fair is the most common) and announces which trait should be rolled against.

For example, climbing an average vertical cliff face, even one with lots of handholds, is not an easy obstacle (Fair difficulty level). For a very hard cliff, the GM may set the difficulty level at Great, which means that the player must make a rolled degree of Great or higher to climb the cliff successfully. The player then rolls against the character’s trait level and tries to match or surpass the difficulty level set by the GM.

In cases where there are degrees of success, the better the roll, the better the character did; the worse the roll, the worse the character did. Remember that the players may not even need to roll unless the characters are under pressure or the task is well above their skill level.

Occasionally, the GM may choose to roll in secret for the PC, such as when even a failed roll would give the player knowledge he wouldn’t otherwise have. These are usually information rolls.

For example, if the GM asks the player to make a roll against an Awareness skill and the player fails, the character doesn’t notice anything out of the ordinary. But the player now knows that there is something out of the ordinary that his character didn’t notice. For some styles of play, it’s better for the GM to make the roll in secret and only mention it on a successful result.

Success Rates

When setting difficulty levels, it may help to keep the statistical results of rolling four Fudge dice in mind.

Table: Success Rates

 

Target

Odds of rolling ex-

actly on 4dF

Odds of rolling tar-

get or higher

+4

1.2%

1.2%

+3

4.9%

6.2%

+2

12.3%

18.5%

+1

19.8%

38.3%

0

23.5%

61.7%

–1

19.8%

81.5%

–2

12.3%

93.8%

–3

4.9%

98.8%

–4

1.2%

100.0%

 

Thus, if your trait is Fair, and the GM says you need a Good result or better to succeed, you need to roll +1 or better, which gives you a 38.3% chance of success. That means you’ll do this slightly less than two times out of five, on the average.